Power in numbers

•March 31, 2010 • Leave a Comment

For anyone interesting in starting classes at any one of our locations throughout N.J. and N.Y.  or would like to host Carbonaro Shihan for a seminar please write an email to chris@bjkninja.com 

Also Please visit www.bjkninja.com and fill out our contact form and get a free training manual as well as information about our latest Bujinkan Products!

Last night in class, we had about 15 students. This number is actually quite large for my group. In total, we have about 30 students, and it is great to have half of them in class. Have you ever noticed how the training changes based on the enviornment you are training in? When I was living in Japan, I saw various groups, as well as amounts of people training in the Hombu dojo. You often hear people complaining that there are too many people in the dojo. However, this is when Soke is at his best. What do I mean by this? Well, the more people in the room the greater the energy. This is why it is very important to pay attention to your enviornment. We need to recognize not only how to use this energy, but also how to control it.

When I speak about control, I do not mean it in a negative way. Not like trying to cage an animal, or lock people in prison. Haven’t you ever wondered why there are little to no injuries in the dojo? This is a form of control. If the teacher of the class becomes overly excited, or overwhelmed this could mean trouble for the students. Often we can get as exictied as a child who recieves a new toy. Sometimes the child can not control his or her excitement, and the toy breaks. We can also be overwhelmed by luck, money, and opportunities. We as budoka have to learn how to control, cultivate and direct this energy.

I find myself at times being overly excited at seminars as well as large classes. I notice teachers like Paul Masse Shihan and Duncan Stewart Shihan teaching and training with a  good sense of control. We often think that the training begins and ends with techniques. However, it is more than that. We also have to be conscious about how our students are training as well. When you use shi gi tai ichi, mind, body, spirit as one, the techniques may look powerful, but yet the technique is actually done with little to no effort.

For example, the other night in class, we were working on Jissen Gata from a grab punch. There was an omote gyaku somewhere in the technique. All of of sudden I heard a student scream STOP! STOP! YOU ARE GOING TO BREAK MY ARM! As I looked over, I noticed one of the students trying to force an omote gyaku on another student. I then stopped the class to explain that I am not using power to force a joint lock, rather I am using my body as one unit to take the joint lock. However, to a new student it looks like I am using great amounts of force to take the technique.

This is another point about energy that we need to be aware of. We as the teacher maybe emitting energy that is too strong for our students to bare. There are many aspects to the Martial arts, no matter which art you may study. Remember to stay focused and train well. Show up to class on time, and make it to as many events as possible. We only have a short time on this earth, and we need to use our time wisely.

Gambatte Kudasai!

Sincerley,

Chris Carbonaro

Bujinkan Shihan

To learn more about Carbonaro Shihan, please visit our about us page at

http://bjkninja.com/shihan_carbonaro.html

Monthly Jissen Gata Training in NYC (Tanjiki Dojo)

•March 16, 2010 • Leave a Comment

For anyone interesting in starting classes at any one of our locations throughout N.J. and N.Y.  or would like to host Carbonaro Shihan for a seminar please write an email to chris@bjkninja.com 

Also Please visit www.bjkninja.com and fill out our contact form and get a free training manual!

Ukemi

Gyogyo no kata

Kihon Happo

Sankakujime

Ketsumyaku (gyokko ryu)

Ippon Nage

Setsuyaku (Shinden Fudo Ryu)

Henka

Jissen Gata

Tachi

For anyone interesting in starting classes at any one of our locations throughout N.J. and N.Y.  or would like to host Carbonaro Shihan for a seminar please write an email to chris@bjkninja.com 

Also Please visit www.bjkninja.com and fill out our contact form and get a free training manual!

Kihon 2010

•March 12, 2010 • Leave a Comment

Over the past few years, there seems to have been more of an emphasis on basics in Japan. One of the first times I heard about this, is when there was a lot of talk about how people who are coming to Japan wearing a black belt; yet they cannot even sit in seiza. When Kamioka-san was teaching me basics when I first started, he was very strict about being flexible, and having good Kamae. Kamioka-san is still very much this same way today.  

In 2008 Noguchi Shihan started teaching more basic classes, taking everyone through the Ten Chi Jin of the Shinden Kihon Gata. Noguchi Shihan still continues these classes today. If you are lacking in your basics, or even if you do not think you are, you should attend these classes. Many people take wild ukemi, and although it looks great, it serves no purpose for being able to attack back. This is very important. One must take ukemi to be able to survive. Surviving may also call for a Kaeshi Waza (Reversal Technique). If you take wild, flashy ukemi, you will not be able to reverse a technique.

On my last trip to Japan Noguchi Sensei performed Hidari Tobi Waza. He told everyone that if you cannot leap like this, that you should take off your black belt. Nagato Sensei said the same thing about being able to do gyaku waza. He said that if you could not perform omotegyaku, that you should take off your black belt.

What does this mean to you? Can you do tobi waza? Can you perform gyaku waza? I believe that we all need to re-exam the way we train. Because of this, I have changed the structure of my class, to include the first 45 minutes which is made up of Ukemi, Gogyo no Kata, and the Kihon Happo. These sets of techniques are essential in your training, because these are the most important things to learn. If you know these three sets of techniques, you can perfom just about any waza. That being said, it is also important to train the feeling, because if you only do one or the other it is not good either. Budo, like life is a struggle of balance. When I train waza, I train them with the mind set of Jissen Gata. I do not just train the waza to perform a movement. I first look at where to move to get out of the way of the opponents second punch. I am also looking at how to keep the opponent off balance at all times, both physically and mentally. This is important. Many people just train the waza to learn a series of movements or techniques. However, without the mindset of Jissen Gata, you will never learn how to defend yourself or others.

It is important to have the right heart (magokoro) as well as the right mind (magokoro). By doing so, one can learn to move freely in the space.

Sincerely,

Chris Carbonaro

Bujinkan Shihan

www.bjkninja.com

Tanuki Dojo Log 3/11/2010

•March 12, 2010 • Leave a Comment

Ukemi

Gyogyo no kata

Kihon Happo

Sankakujime

Ketsumyaku (gyokko ryu)

Ippon Nage

Setsuyaku (Shinden Fudo Ryu)

Henka

Jissen Gata

Hanbo/Tachi

For anyone interesting in starting classes at any one of our locations throughout N.J. and N.Y. Please visit www.bjkninja.com and fill out our contact form and get a free training manual!

Tanuki Dojo Log 3/9/2010

•March 10, 2010 • Leave a Comment

Ukemi

Gyogyo no kata

Kihon Happo

Sankakujime

Ketsumyaku (gyokko ryu)

Henka

Jissen Gata

For anyone interesting in starting classes at any one of our locations throughout N.J. and N.Y. Please visit www.bjkninja.com and fill out our contact form and get a free training manual!

 

Shima Dojo Grand Opening 2/20/2010 Review

•March 9, 2010 • Leave a Comment

On Feburary 20-21st, old faces and new faces got together for the grand opening of Eastern Martial Arts Center. Jay Zimmerman and Chris Carbonaro shared their latest training experiences. It was a wonderful blend of jissen gata from the kihon as well as from the free flowing side.
 
Several of us recently returned from Japan a few weeks before the seminar and I will tell you, it was a lot like being back in hombu dojo. We covered quite a bit of taijutsu, as well as, hanbo and taichi. The same themes we covered in our trip.
 
There was several significant things pulled from the seminar. One, was to use the concepts you learn in kihon and apply in a jissen gata style. That was a big point in several classes we attended in Japan. Two, was how important basics were. Although much of the training was somewhat “advanced”, looking around I realized very quickly how much all of us need to work on basics. Many of us are encumbered by seeing things that we think are new, but in reality the “new” is just peices of what we learn from the kihon. We just need to devolp or basics until they are second nature and we need to develop the eyes to see this in the techniques others demonstrate.
 
It was eye-opening!
 
It was so fantastic to see friends from near by and far away.
 
Please don’t mix the next opportunity for training at this level, pay attention to our calender for upcoming events at our dojo!


 
Doug Tweedy

Bujinkan Shidoshi

http://easternmartialartscenter.com/

If you are interested in training in the Bujinkan, please visit www.bjkninja.com and fill out our contact form!

Sincerely,

Chris Carbonaro

Bujinkan Shihan

www.bjkninja.com

Budo Mindset

•March 4, 2010 • Leave a Comment

I have never been one to harp on etiquette, however I now realize the importance of it, and I have started to impliment more etiquette at my dojo as well as my seminars. When living in Japan, it is easy to be in the right mindset to train, because the country of Japan has it’s own feeling of how to act. This feeling could be felt as soon as you get off the plane. The country of Japan is based on a military system. This comes from the way of the Samurai. Even today in the business world, you will find many etiquettes still being practiced. Although we may not be Japanese, it is important for us to have the Japanese mind set while training martial arts. After all the Bujinkan is a Japanese martial art. Soke has mentioned this alot lately.

“If we truly want to understand the Bujinkan Martial Arts, we have to first understand that it is a Japanese Martial Art. Second, we should not put our own thoughts and ideas into the training, and I am still learning from my teacher.” (Soke Massaki Hatsumi)

When students of the dojo are not in the right mindset to train,  there are many openings in there techniques. The whole essence of Soke and Nagato Sensei’s training, is to have no openings. We start by doing this by learning how to punch and kick correctly. After that, we then need to learn how to defend correctly. We must always keep our opponent off balance as well. If not then your opponent will be able to attack back.

Soke and I were talking about this very thing in Japan a few weeks ago. I explained to him that many people train slow, and try to control the opponent, but that is the hardest part isn’t it Sensei? Soke then told me that if you do not control your opponent well, he will counter attack.

Many people like to get together to have fun. However, we should train more with the mind of survival and less play in our movement until we reach 11 12 13 14 15 dan ranks. Here is what Soke has said about the ranks in the Bujinkan:

“Up until 5th dan, everyone should be using power and taking this time to build up your body. This is because you are still training in the basics at this level.” “From 5th dan until 10th dan, you should be training in various techniques, henka.”Once you reach 11th dan, then you should move like me.”

These points are very important for our training. Friendships will be made, however, the focus of training should be on survival (Jissen Gata).

Keep going!

Sincerely,
Chris Carbonaro
Bujinkan Shihan